The Pep Rally

Calling all Christians! We are not called to mumble the Gospel. We are called to boldly proclaim it.

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I attended a small high school. During football season, the entire school would assemble for a pep rally. After the cheerleaders cheered, the Senior football players walked onto the stage to speak. One by one, with their shoulders slumped and heads hanging, they would all mumble the same thing – something like

“We’ve been working hard this week to prepare for ____________ . I hope you’ll come to the game to support us.”

And then they walked off the stage. Year after year, I watched this pathetically anemic ritual as I awaited my senior year.

I was somewhere in the middle of the lineup of senior players slated to speak. Not first. Not last. I awaited my turn as I listened to my fellow senior team mates give the same pathetic speech they had heard from seniors for years.

Finally my moment came. I stood at attention and bellowed:

“I’m proud to be an Aucilla Warrior and I really don’t care if you come to the game or not, but if you decide to show up, the game starts at 7 and you can watch us kick their butts.”

The entire audience leaped to their feet! The noise was not just deafening, it went on and on. In an instant, everybody was proud to be an Aucilla Warrior! The principle had to come on stage to restore order. The cheerleaders had never been able to get that much noise from the audience! Spontaneously, all the senior players left the stage. There was nothing left to say. Nobody wanted to follow my speech.

Bear in mind that in 1977 at a Christian school, the utterance of the phrase “kick their butts” was brazen, risky, and perhaps even profane. You could say it wasn’t “politically correct”. I didn’t care. I meant every word. I had been rehearsing that speech for years. From that point forward, pep rallies were supercharged events. In an instant, my boldness changed everything.

I was an average athlete. I was an average student. I had never been on a date when I gave that speech. In other words, I was no rock star – until then that is. The following week, people would approach me and effusively thank me for my bravery and boldness. My stock soared. Girls that never paid attention to me started hanging around me. You get the idea.

Question

Was I suddenly a better athlete? Better looking? Better dressed? More money? Better grades? Nope. I was the same person I had been before, but I was proud to be an Aucilla Warrior and I simply proclaimed the truth boldly.

By the way, we won that game – and many others.

I think you know where I’m going with this. Are you proud to be a Christian? I don’t mean in a haughty or self righteous sense. Consider what hangs in the balance. It’s a lot more than a Friday night football game. Let’s boldly proclaim the Gospel. No more anemic mumbling speeches.

If anyone is ashamed of me and my message in these adulterous and sinful days, the Son of Man will be ashamed of that person when he returns in the glory of his Father with the holy angels. Mark 8:38 (NIV)


That’s what I think. I’m interested in your thoughts. There’s lots of ways to hit me up so let me hear from you.

You can leave your comments below.

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Author: Mark Prasek

Christian Technologist. Find me on Twitter @DataGenesis

2 thoughts on “The Pep Rally”

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